Creating a Colorful World of Her Own | MISSBISH Robin Eisenberg

Date

June 8, 2017
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You may not instantly know the name Robin Eisenberg, but you have definitely seen her work.  Her creations have been featured on GIFY, online magazines like Broadly, and Thrasher tees. The colorful and dreamy world she has created includes alien girls – usually in outer space taking baths, eating pizza, and portraying complete confidence in their own skin. Robin’s bad*ss babes allow us to escape to a world that we wish existed.

MISSBISH sat down to talk the artist about where she gets her inspiration from, and her advice for women in the art world.

How did you become an artist?
I’ve always loved drawing. I have so many sketchbooks from when I was a kid that are full of epic drawings of elves and unicorns (and also really bad depressing poetry, especially in high school, haha). Sketching was always the thing I did when I got home, or when I was supposed to be studying. I never got bored or tired of it. I finally decided to try and make drawing the thing that I did all the time. It was sort of a slow process, but I’m so happy I decided to try and see if I could do it. Now I draw 10-15 hours a day and I still don’t ever get sick of it.

Your use of colorful characters and intergalactic landscapes has created an entirely different world. What do you want people to take away from your art?
I’m so very curious about other worlds, planets, dimensions, etc. I always get a feeling of dreamy coziness when I think about space and the possibility of everything beyond what we’re familiar with. I think it comes from growing up being obsessed with Star Trek and fantasy novels. As a kid and as a teenager, I felt like I belonged more in those imaginary worlds than in the world around me. I find it incredibly frustrating that I may never learn of actual alien life or be able to explore places beyond our relatively limited scope – so many questions will go unanswered in my lifetime! Creating my own weird worlds (while also including familiar elements and things that I know and love) is a way for me to feel a tiny bit closer to all of that.

How do you become inspired to continue creating new pieces? What is your creative process like?
I get ideas for new drawings constantly – from just walking around or seeing a photo of something, to watching Planet Earth or having a conversation with someone. I feel like the hardest time for me to be inspired is when I’m just sitting around actively trying to feel inspired. I write things down all the time and have tons of really weird and random lists on my phone. Here’s an example of one I just found: “women rising out of water, snake of some kind, cotton candy hot air balloon, fur texture.” Anyway, I mentally prioritize drawing ideas in my head based on how excited I am about them, and then whenever I’m waiting to hear back about a client project, I’ll work on my own stuff. I’m trying to prioritize my own projects over client work, as I’ve been really struggling to find the time to make anything new and personal and I definitely want to change that.


“Focus on what you want to create, and try not to feel pressured to fit into anyone’s expectations of who you are or what you should be making or doing.”


We love that your art primarily features powerful women. What’s your advice for women in the art world?
Do your best and be proud of your work. Take care of yourself. Focus on what you want to create, and try not to feel pressured to fit into anyone’s expectations of who you are or what you should be making or doing.

You recently collaborated with Thrasher, what was that experience like for you?
It was so much fun! I have always been in love with skateboarding and draw a lot of skater alien babes. I used to spend a lot of time at skate parks with friends who were really amazing at skateboarding, and I would always bring my sketchbook and just hang out drawing and people watching. It was so cool to work with Thrasher, and it’s been so rad to see so many people wearing the tees!

Do you have a dream collaboration or item that you would love to create?
As far as collabs, I think it would be awesome to work with Mattel on a space alien barbie doll series! I would also love to start working on larger scale drawings and paintings.

What do you have planned for this upcoming year? What should we be on the lookout for?
I’m working on some rad clothing items which will hopefully be in the final stages of production in the next month. I’m so excited about that! I also have dreams of pausing time to work extensively on a graphic novel and/or animated series. I really need that pause button!

We’re living in a time where women and political activism go hand in hand. How does your art come into play with that?
I try my best to create art that makes people feel stronger, or feel understood – or just feel inspired to express their own feelings or be active in their own way. I think it’s incredibly important to encourage other voices, and to support and feel supported. Being an artist has opened the door to learning about so many amazing businesses run by female, transgender and non-binary artists. I’m constantly inspired and motivated by them, and I’m really happy if I’m ever able to do the same in return.

What are three hidden gems in LA?
1) Wild Oak Cafe. A tiny spot in the hills of Glendale. It’s really beautiful around there and the food is amazing! Especially breakfast.

2) Brand Park is lovely. I grew up walking around it and imagining my life at 30 while hiking in the hills behind the park. They also do occasional street food cinemas and summer concerts there which is neat.

3) La Cubana on Glendale Ave. is awesome. My parents have been getting takeout from them once a week since I was a kid, back when it was in a different location. So good!

What does MISSBISH mean to you?
This GIF by Libby VanderPloeg.

Who is your MISSBISH? Tell us who she is and why she’s an inspiration to you?
Can I cheat on my answer and say the women in my family? I’m so grateful to be alongside women who have taught me how to be bold, inquisitive, strong, and vulnerable. They are seriously awe-inspiring and I feel incredibly lucky to know them and be able to learn from them.

Photographer: Christina Choi