Get Cultured with MISSBISH Simone Boyce

Date

May 27, 2017
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Here at MISSBISH we feature fabulous bishes who have made big names for themselves, and who inspire females from all different walks of life. Simone Boyce is all that and then some; a two time Emmy nominated reporter, producer and writer, she previously worked as Fox 5 NY’s culture reporter before moving to LA to take on other endeavors. She executive produced her own half hour show “Simone in the City,” which takes viewers on adventures around New York City. On top of that, she wrote and produced a documentary that talks about being biracial in today’s society as well as in the past. Simone successfully integrates culture, entertainment and news while keeping it fresh and interesting. There is much more to learn about this influential woman, so continue reading her interview below…

When did you know you wanted to pursue a career in broadcast journalism? Is it something you’ve always been interested in?
I had always been a news hound but never really considered journalism as a career until college. Shortly after I entered the University of Florida as a nursing major, I realized I wouldn’t make it past the first chemistry course and switched to the college of journalism. I’d loved writing and performing from a young age, so reporting seemed like a natural fit. Never looked back!

Who has been your biggest influence or mentor to date?
There are so many women who have influenced me – Oprah, Barbara Walters, Katie Couric, and my friend Rosanna Scotto are all women who have paved the way for female broadcasters. What I love about Oprah is that she brought people together who disagreed and created a space for rational, relevant discourse. There will never be another Oprah, but I hope to bring some of her fearlessness to my own work.

What would you like to accomplish in the next five years?
I hope to have accumulated more producing credits in five years. I’m producing a documentary series right now. Overall, I’m making a transition from entertainment to harder news, so the next five years will probably look very different than my last five. Taking on this next chapter has been really exciting and fulfilling for me.

When you are not working, what are you doing in your free time?
Probably boxing, by the water, or at home chillin’ with my friends. I’m a low-key lady.

Describe to us how your first hosting experience was…
I try to block it out. I think it was a red carpet for the CW premiere of Hellcats. I can only imagine how nervous and awkward I was. I still am both of those things sometimes!

What advice would you give to someone starting out as a journalist?
Find your niche and excel at that before broadening your focus to other areas. And learn all sides of the trade. If you want to be in TV news, know how to write, produce and edit. Storytelling is extremely important. Internships really helped me get my foot in the door.


“Find your niche and excel at that before broadening your focus to other areas. Learn all sides of the trade.”


Tell us about “Simone in the City”…
That was a ton of fun! FOX asked me to create a half-hour version of my daily arts and culture segment. It was a summer run with a weekend time slot so I tried to incorporate hidden gems our viewers could explore around New York City. I jetskied, went fishing, climbed a mountain. It was a huge learning experience for me in the best way possible. That was the first time I had to fight for a producing credit. I laid out a strong case for my boss as to why I deserved it and eventually he made me executive producer.

You wrote and produced a documentary about race and being biracial, can you explain any obstacles you’ve had to overcome in regards to this?
I’ve been very fortunate and haven’t experienced nearly as much discrimination as others have before me. I do think some of the normal adolescent struggles are heightened when you’re multi-ethnic. I was too white for some, and too black for others. My incredible parents always encouraged me to embrace my European and African-American heritage in equal measure. When you get older though, you realize society – and the TV industry – isn’t as understanding. Just recently I was offered an on-air job under the condition that I straighten my hair. I think that mindset is slowly changing, but it still throws me to hear that.

You’ve rubbed shoulders with some big names like Tom Cruise and Taraji P. Henson, who has been your most interesting interview to date?
Lin Manuel Miranda or Dr. Neil DeGrasse Tyson because they are both geniuses!

How would you describe yourself in three words?
I always feel awkward answering this question but here goes…big-hearted free spirit

What TV show have you recently binge watched?
This is Us is my jam! I love Insecure and Girls on HBO. I’m also super into Stranger Things and Love on Netflix.

You’ve recently moved back to LA from NYC, what are three hidden gems in LA?
After being in New York for a few years, I’m admittedly still learning LA’s new hidden gems. The 14th Factory is a trippy art installation inside an old warehouse. It’s hard to describe but you can see some photos of it on my Instagram. And I’ve been going to Malibu Seafood on the PCH since I was a kid for delicious fried fish.

What does MISSBISH mean to you and who is your MISSBISH?
A MISSBISH is the kind of girl I want to work with. She’s no drama and all hustle. I know too many dope MISSBISH’s to single out just one!

Photographer: Aldo Carrera