Kendrick Lamar Talks Religion, Ghostwriting, & More in New Interview

Date

August 11, 2017
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Hip Hop mogul, Kendrick Lamar, is the star of Rolling Stone‘s newest cover story. The article touches upon topics such as his family life, ghostwriting in the Hip Hop world, and Donald Trump. Here are some our favorite moments from the interview:

When asked if Kendrick felt as if he were special as a kid, he includes that there were expectations he had to carry out for his family. A trait that is prominent in his character today:

“From what my family tells me, I carried myself as a man – that’s why they called me “Man Man.” It put a stigma on the idea of me reacting as a kid sometimes – I would hurt myself and they would expect me not to cry. That put a lot of responsibility on me, got me ready for the responsibility my fans put upon me. I ended up getting tough skin, too, even with criticism. My first time in the studio, [label chief] Top Dawg was like, “Man, that shit wack.” Other artists around couldn’t handle that. But it made me go back in the booth and go harder.”

In the past, Kendrick has deemed himself as the best rapper — a statement he still stands by — leading him to relay his opinion on ghostwriting in the industry:

“It depends on what arena you’re putting yourself in. I called myself the best rapper. I cannot call myself the best rapper if I have a ghostwriter. If you’re saying you’re a different type of artist and you don’t really care about the art form of being the best rapper, then so be it. Make great music. But the title, it won’t be there.”

In addition, his limited remarks about Donald Trump hold as advice we can all learn from:

“I mean, it’s like beating a dead horse. We already know what it is. Are we gonna keep talking about it or are we gonna take action? You just get to a point where you’re tired of talking about it. It weighs you down and it drains your energy when you’re speaking about something or someone that’s completely ridiculous. So, on and off the album, I took it upon myself to take action in my own community. On the record, I made an action to not speak about what’s going on in the world or the places they put us in. Speak on self; reflection of self first. That’s where the initial change will start from.”

The rest of the article delves into Kendrick’s trip to Africa, how he was able to get Bono on “XXX,” and how it was working with Beyoncé for Lemonade. Check out the rest of the article here.