The MISSBISH Photography Workshop | Tasha Bleu

Photographer: Tasha Bleu

Instagram: @tashableu

Location: New York City

Style: I would describe my shooting style as well composed, eye-catching, and timely, yet timeless. I love shooting on location, but I can photograph anything, anywhere. I mainly photograph men’s fashion, exclusive sneakers, and women wearing men’s apparel. I'm currently switching up my style a bit, so stay tuned!

Equipment: I'm a Canon lover, although Nikon is great for video, I mainly use Canon or Sony bodies and lenses. My main combination is a Canon 6D with a 50mm L Series Lens... KILLER COMBO!

Lenses: Any L Series Canon lens! I'm becoming a Zeiss fan when it comes to lenses too!

Filter or nah?  I do love using filters; I feel that specific filters communicate directly to a specific photography inclined audience. My go-to filter would be the HYPEBEAST "HB2" VSCO preset. That filter really brings out the colors in my work.


“Julia Noni is a brilliant photographer who embraces dark skinned models and complimentary colors in her work. She inspires me to stay true to my imagination and to always remember to take risks in photography.”

Can't live without: Besides my Canon gear, I can't live without my GoPro. I used a GoPro to take live photos of tradeshow attendees at my interactive art installation that was held at AGENDA Tradeshow in New York City last year, presented by FLEXFIT and it's been an essential item ever since. It's become really handy now that I've been quietly working on an underwater project.

Favorite photographers: 
My favorite photographers include David LaChapelle, Pete Eckert and Julia Noni. I list a few others in my Lookbook Skillshare class when it comes to lookbook photography, but these three photographers really keep me inspired when I run low on inspiration fuel.

David LaChapelle is the reason why I named my photography company, Treu Bleu Imagery; he inspires me to always use the highest level of imagination in my work, no matter how much equipment I have. No matter what the task is at hand, the ultimate motive is to stay true to your imagination.

Pete Eckert is a blind photographer. I found out about him through a contest I entered when I first started shooting. I HIGHLY recommend that you watch his "Artists Wanted" video on Vimeo. Losing your eyesight is a very scary thing as a photographer and he is still creating fine art photography even though he is blind. That is enough inspiration right there.

Julia Noni is a brilliant photographer who embraces dark skinned models and complimentary colors in her work. I found out about her through her commercial photography for Nike. She also inspires me to stay true to my imagination and to always remember to take risks in photography.

First experience:
As a child, I was always into documenting moments and capturing time; especially, once I started realizing that people don't last forever. I started shooting in 2010 and it has opened my mind to so many other things since that time. I was actually Youtube-taught. LOL... I wasn't technically trained when I started, but I have taken some classes since then. But I am 100% self-taught and have had other photographers mentor me at Karmaloop, but I have never worked under anyone.


“When I'm behind the lens I'm not only a photographer but I become a curator and an art director.”


Why Photography?
When I'm behind the lens I'm not only a photographer but I become a curator and an art director.

Tips / Secrets:
1)Get down and dirty.
Sitting on the floor to shoot someone standing always makes them look taller.

2) Reflections.
Using reflections in puddles always helps the subject look better.

3)Improvise.
Shooting through a fishnet stocking really gives a cool effect.

Tag a friend to feature and ask them a question:
I would recommend Brianna Alysse. She is Kehlani's tour photographer. I really love how she captures precious moments on the road and I hope to collaborate with Brianna in the near future.
Although she uses digital more, I would like to ask Brianna about shooting film and what tips she can offer on shooting film and editing videos. I've only used a film camera a few times and I would love to learn more about processing the final product.

Brianna Alysse answered: "As far as the question goes, I honestly just started doing videography. Photography was always my main focus, but I figured if I expanded into doing videos it could help me even just become a better photographer. Filming isn't as hard as it seems. It's the editing that's pretty hard, finding the right clips, cutting them at the right time, making sure it goes along with the music in the background, but its deff not impossible, you just really have to sit there and teach yourself, or even just looking up youtube videos on how to edit is always helpful. I do that pretty often. Try recording the interesting things. Try recording at all times if possible because you never know what exciting moment you might miss. Always get b-roll as well. When putting the video together the b-roll clips come in handy, it makes the videos that much more interesting."

Website: treubleuimagery.com

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